Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places

From the DHS National Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of Infrastructure Protection. Security of Soft Targets and Crowded Places–Resource Guide (20 pp)

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Armed Security for Churches

Guns and God: Growing number of churches want armed security
“Fifty years ago, you could say no guns should be allowed in church, but times have changed,” said a police chief who runs a volunteer church security team.

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Table Top Exercises

Ohio’s Emergency Management office offers three toolkits for active shooter and other threats.

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Disaster Relief Workers Feed Federal Workers

It is a sad day when employed federal workers who must work without being paid have to be provided with food aid. See: Disaster Relief Volunteers Prepare meals for Federal Employees Affected by Shutdown.

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Disaster Management for Mosques

Slide set on disaster management for mosques.  Author is Younus Imam, of Toronto, Canada.

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Decline in Faith Based Organizations

Religious practice is declining. Here’s why that’s bad news for disaster recovery

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Happy Holidays

Special thanks to the National Disaster Interfaiths Network for their fine work and their support of this endeavor.  They are a treasure trove of resources and an inspiration to this blogger.

We wish all of our readers and supporters a happy holiday season and a productive, healthy 2019.

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The Cost of Armed Guards for a House of Worship

Here’s what it costs to put your synagogue under armed guard

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Advice In Case of Active Shooter

What Experts Know about Active Shooter Situation.

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Highlights of a Security Study

From The Conversation: How safe is your place of worship? Some findings:

Crimes, most commonly vandalism and theft, were committed at about 40 percent of congregations in the year prior to the survey. This overall percentage was not significantly different across religious traditions.

When we dug deeper, though, we found that synagogues and mosques deal with crime-related problems that are much different than the average church.

According to news reports, the Tree of Life synagogue did not have armed guards present at the time of the shooting. Many community leaders rebuked Trump’s statements and argued that increasing armed security was not the solution.

In 2015 we conducted a national study of religious congregations’ experiences with, fears of and preparations for crime. Our study, which was supported by the National Science Foundation, featured a survey of over 1,300 places of worship and in-depth interviews with more than 50 congregational leaders. We asked each leader – individuals with significant knowledge of the congregation’s operations – about the congregation’s history of crime, its security measures, the individual’s assessment of future crime risk and fears, and a variety of questions about the congregation’s operations and neighborhood.

… our in-depth interviews with leaders of congregations found that synagogues and mosques tend to put a great deal of thought into security. For synagogues in particular, our interviews found that local organizations are effective at sharing information and resources about security threats and strategies – for example, the Jewish Community Relations Councils.

Crimes, most commonly vandalism and theft, were committed at about 40 percent of congregations in the year prior to the survey. This overall percentage was not significantly different across religious traditions.

When we dug deeper, though, we found that synagogues and mosques deal with crime-related problems that are much different than the average church.
Our survey found, for instance, that synagogues and mosques were three times more likely than congregations overall to have received an explicit threat in the prior year.  Respondents also reported significantly greater fear that congregants would be assaulted or murdered on the congregation’s property. This helps explain another pattern we found: Jewish and Muslim congregations are in many ways far ahead of congregations representing other religious traditions when it comes to thinking about and implementing security measure

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